Does This Apocalypse Make Me Look Fat? The music and research behind the play

Does This Apocalypse Make Me Look Fat? A Comedy about Broken Bodies–Large and Small is a one-person, multi-character play written and performed by Peterson Toscano. Serving as dramaturge, sound designer, and collaborating, Alex Skitolsky, helped Peterson shape the play and did much of the research for the historical content of the play. Below we have included both music and sound credits along with the sources we used in the research for the play.

Poster design for October 15, 2014 premiere at Susquehanna University

Poster design for October 15, 2014 premiere at Susquehanna University

Much of the music used in Does This Apocalypse Make Me Look Fat? A Comedy about Broken Bodies–Large and Small, was obtained through Creative Commons license from the Dusted Wax Kingdom netlabel , including the songs listed below by Frenic, Boogie Belgique, and Giyo.  All music used in this performance was found at the Internet Archive and is listed in the order played:

1. “Eternal Plains” Frenic, Mongolia EP

2. “Fac Ut Portem” from Gioacchino Rossini’s Stabat Mater, performed by St. Matthew’s Concert Choir.

3. “Eternal Plains” Frenic, Mongolia EP

4. “Dance with the Democrat” Boogie Belgique, Blueberry Hill LP

5. “Faux Monsoon” Giyo, Tons of Sky LP

6. “Ulan Bator” Frenic, Mongolia EP

7. “Hello Sinner” Boogie Belgique, Nightwalker Vol. 2 LP

8. “Earthbound” Giyo, Tons of Sky LP

9. “Eternal Plains” Frenic, Mongolia EP

10. “Over and Over” Mark Chadwick, 5 Song Demo

Additional sound effects used in this performance were created by Mike Koenig and M. Smith and/or otherwise obtained through license from SoundBible.com or pond5.com.

Details about the life of Walt Whitman and the Nazi siege on Leningrad, as contained in Scenes Two and Five respectively, are historically accurate and were based upon thorough research.

In addition to consulting Whitman’s own texts (Leaves of Grass, Memoranda During The War, The Great Army of the Sick, and Drum Taps), we also relied on Walt Whitman: A Gay Life by Gary Schmidgall, The Sacrificial Years: A Chronicle of Walt Whitman’s Experiences in the Civil War edited by John Harmon McElroy, as well as Angel Price’s Whitman’s Drum Taps and Washington’s Civil War Hospitals and the excellent Walt Whitman Archive.

Historical details and survivor narratives from the 900 day siege of Leningrad were drawn  primarily from Leningrad: State of Siege by Michael Jones, Leningrad Siege and Symphony by Bryan Moynahan, Writing the Siege of Leningrad: Women’s Diaries, Memoirs, and Documentary Prose by Cynthia Simons, The Besieged: Voices from the Siege of Leningrad by Caroline Watson, and The 900 Days: The Siege of Leningrad by Harrison E. Salisbury.

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